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  • Figures of Speech | #1 | Chiasmus

    Figures of Speech Chiasmus


    Chiasmus | As a figure of speech

    Pronounced

    [kee-AZ-muss]

    Etymology

    “Chiasmus comes from the Greek “chiasm” meaning “X”; or diagonal.

    Meaning

    Chiasmus is a rhetorical device, literally meaning “to shape like the letter Χ”, is a “reversal of grammatical structures in successive phrases or clauses – but no repetition of words”.

    This speech follows a diagonal structure.

    For instance, the following sentence from Socrates, 5th Century B.C.

    Bad men live that they may eat and drink, whereas good men eat and drink that they may live.”

    Let’s break this down into:
    1. parts in the sentence
    2. arguments (X & Y) in the sentence.

    Break-Up #1 | The Parts in the Sentence

    Break-Up #2 | The Arguments in the Sentence

    X = type of men  | Y = their purpose

    X do (something) so that they Y, whereas X do Y that they get something else.”

    As per www.literarydevices.net, we should notice that the second half of this sentence is an inverted form of the first half, both grammatically and logically. What must also be noticed that this reversal was achieved without repeating the words across both parts of the sentence.

    More Details

    • Chiasmus should not be confused for antimetabole, which also involves a reversal of grammatical structures in successive phrases or clauses, but unlike chiasmus, it presents a repetition of words in an X-Y-Y-X configuration.
    • E.g. “Live to eat; or eat to live.” would be the antimetabole way of saying the same thing, as it involves repetition of words in an X-Y-Y-X format

    More Examples

    1. “By day the frolic, and the dance by night.” — Samuel Johnson, The Vanity of Human Wishes (1794)
    2. “Despised, if ugly; if she’s fair, betrayed.” — Mary Leapor, “Essay on Woman” (1751)

    How to Cite This Logophilia Blog Post

    If you want to cite this blog post from Logophilia in your research, choose one of the following formats.

    MLA

    Logophilia Education. https://logophilia.in/2020/04/10/figures-speech-1-chiasmus/ . 11 April 2020. Dhruv Raj Sharma. <www.logophilia.in>

    The Chicago Manual of Style

    Logophilia Education. 2020. https://logophilia.in/2020/04/10/figures-speech-1-chiasmus/ . Dhruv Raj Sharma. April 11. www.logophilia.in.

    APA

    Logophilia Education. (2020, April 11). https://logophilia.in/2020/04/10/figures-speech-1-chiasmus/ . (D. R. Sharma, Producer, & Logophilia Education) Retrieved from Logophilia Education: www.logophilia.in

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  • Understand “Cupidity” Through Etymology

    The Etymology of “Cupidity”

    The word “cupidity” comes from the Latin parts “cupid” (to boil) & “ity” (phenomenon of). Here “boiling” means to crave for something. Hence, “cupidity” is a lusting after or craving for material possession and acquisition, much like “avarice”.

    Cognates: Other derivatives from “cupid” include “Cupid“, “cupidous”, “cupidinous”, etc.

    What are you boiling for? 😀

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  • Understand “Revenue” through Etymology

    The Etymology of “Revenue”

    The word “revenue” comes from the Latin parts “re” (back) & “ven” (to come). “Revenue” is that (part of our investment) which comes back to us.

    Cognates: Other derivatives from “ven” include convent, adventure, invent, circumvent, etc.

    The Etymology of Revenue


    2017 © Logophilia Education Pvt. Ltd.
    #Logophilia #Etymology #Words #Vocabulary #NoBetterWayToLearnEnglish #IsntThisHowYouShouldStudy #picoftheday #love #follow #EnglishWords #EnglishEtymology #EtymologyEducation #WordHistory #WordOrigins #Understand #MyFavouriteWords #Savage #like #comment #TheOriginOfRevenue #TheEtymologyOfRevenue #LatinWordsInEnglish

     

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  • Understand “Savage” Through Etymology

     The Etymology of “Savage”

    The word “savage” comes from the Latin part “sav”  (wild) & the French suffix “age” (one who). We describe people, animals, or things as “savage” when they are wild, or undomesticated, or untamed.

    The Etymology of Savage


    Hey, wild thing! 😀
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  • Understand “Norway” Through Etymology 

    The Etymology of “Norway” 

    To the north! 😀

    Continue →